top of page

Breach of Contract in India: Types, Cases, and Remedies

Updated: Feb 4

Contracts are the foundation of business and legal transactions, providing a framework for the rights and obligations of the parties involved. A breach of contract occurs when one party fails to fulfill its contractual obligations, leading to legal consequences.


Contract Act Breach


In this article, we'll explore the concept of breach of contract under the Indian Contract Act, 1872. We'll delve into the different types of breaches, penalties, and remedies available, and analyze prominent Indian court cases to understand how the Indian legal system addresses breach of contract issues.

Content:

I. Defining Breach of Contract II. Types of breach of contract III. Factors determining the breach of contract IV. Breach of contract : penalty V. Remedies for breach of contract


I. Defining Breach of Contract in India

Breach of contract, under the Indian Contract Act, 1872, refers to a situation where one or more parties to a legally binding agreement fail to fulfill their contractual obligations.


This failure can take various forms, such as non-performance, partial performance, or defective performance of the terms agreed upon. A breach of contract may lead to legal consequences, including penalties and remedies, which can involve the payment of damages, specific performance, or injunctions.


II. Types of breach of contract


A. Actual breach of contract


An actual breach of contract occurs when a party fails to perform their obligations as specified in the contract at the time performance is due.


Examples of actual breach include non-payment, incomplete performance, or delivering substandard goods or services.


In the case of R. Venkataraman vs. Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd. (1998), the court found that there was an actual breach when the defendant failed to provide a petroleum dealership to the plaintiff.


B. Anticipatory breach of contract in India

An anticipatory breach of contract, also known as a constructive breach, occurs when a party indicates their intention not to perform their obligations before the performance is due. T


his can happen through clear communication or actions that make it impossible for them to fulfill the contract.


In India, anticipatory breach is recognized under Section 39 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872. The case of Hari Shankar vs. Anant Ram (1999) is an example where the court found an anticipatory breach of contract when the defendant refused to complete a sale of property.


C. Material breach of contract

A material breach of contract occurs when a party's failure to perform their obligations is so significant that it defeats the entire purpose of the contract.


This type of breach usually justifies the non-breaching party's termination of the contract and the pursuit of legal remedies.


In the case of State Bank of India vs. Mula Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd. (2006), the court determined that the defendant's failure to repay a loan was a material breach, entitling the bank to enforce its security interest.


D. Repudiatory breach of contract


A repudiatory breach is a serious breach of contract that allows the aggrieved party to either accept the breach and terminate the contract or affirm the contract and continue with its performance.


This type of breach typically occurs when one party refuses or is unable to perform their contractual obligations.


In the Indian case of Indian Oil Corporation Ltd. vs. Amritsar Gas Service (1991), the court ruled that the defendant's refusal to pay outstanding dues constituted a repudiatory breach, allowing the plaintiff to terminate the contract.


III. Factors determining the breach of contract


A. The terms of the contract

  • The terms of the contract play a significant role in determining whether a breach has occurred.

  • The explicit and implicit obligations of the parties, as well as the conditions and warranties stipulated in the contract, are essential in assessing a breach.

In the case of M/S. Alopi Parshad & Sons Ltd. vs. Union of India (1960), the court emphasized the importance of considering the parties' intentions when interpreting contract terms. The court stated that the interpretation of a contract should be based on the parties' intentions and the circumstances under which the contract was formed.


B. The extent of the breach

  • The extent of the breach is another crucial factor in determining the appropriate classification and remedies for a breach of contract.

  • The severity of the breach is typically assessed in terms of the non-breaching party's expectations and the degree to which the breaching party has deviated from their contractual obligations.

In the case of State Bank of India vs. Mula Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd. (2006), the court determined that the defendant's failure to repay a loan constituted a material breach, entitling the bank to enforce its security interest.


C. The impact of the breach on the parties involved

  • The impact of a breach on the parties involved is also a significant factor in determining the breach's classification and the remedies available.

  • Courts consider the non-breaching party's loss and the breaching party's actions to assess the appropriate remedy.


In the case of Food Corporation of India vs. M/S. Kamdhenu Cattle Feed Industries (1993), the court highlighted the significance of timely performance in contracts. The defendant's delay in supplying cattle feed caused the plaintiff substantial loss, and the court awarded damages accordingly.


IV. Breach of contract : penalty

A breach of contract penalty refers to the consequences imposed on the breaching party for failing to fulfill their contractual obligations. Penalties can take various forms and are typically aimed at compensating the non-breaching party for their losses or preventing further breaches.


A. Purpose of penalties in contract law

  • In contract law, penalties are typically designed to protect the interests of the non-breaching party and deter future breaches.

  • They are often stipulated in the contract itself in the form of liquidated damages clauses or other provisions outlining the consequences of a breach.

  • Courts may also impose penalties based on the principles of equity and justice, considering factors such as the extent of the breach, the impact on the parties involved, and the nature of the contract.


B. Common types of penalties


1. Liquidated damages:


Liquidated damages are a predetermined amount of compensation that parties agree upon in the contract to be paid in the event of a breach. These damages are meant to reflect a genuine pre-estimate of the non-breaching party's loss due to the breach. In the case of Fateh Chand vs. Balkishan Das (1963), the Supreme Court of India held that liquidated damages must be reasonable and not penal in nature. In the case of ONGC vs. Saw Pipes Ltd. (2003), the court upheld the enforcement of liquidated damages for the defendant's failure to deliver goods on time.

2. Specific performance:


Specific performance is a court order that compels the breaching party to fulfill their contractual obligations as originally agreed upon. Specific performance is generally granted when damages are inadequate to compensate the non-breaching party, or the subject matter of the contract is unique or irreplaceable. In the case of R.L. Kalathia & Co. vs. State of Gujarat (2011), the Supreme Court of India ruled that specific performance could be granted when the contract involved immovable property or when monetary compensation would not provide adequate relief. In case of Shree Hanuman Cotton Mills vs. Tata Air Services (1970), the court granted specific performance to the plaintiff as the defendant had failed to supply a unique type of machinery, which could not be easily procured from another source.

3. Injunctions:

An injunction is a court order that prohibits a party from committing a breach or compels a party to take certain actions to rectify a breach. Injunctions may be granted to maintain the status quo, prevent irreparable harm, or protect the non-breaching party's rights. In the case of Gujarat Bottling Co. Ltd. vs. Coca-Cola Co. (1995), the court issued an injunction to prevent the defendant from entering into a competing agreement, which would have breached its existing contract with the plaintiff.


V. Remedies for breach of contract

The choice of remedy in breach of contract cases depends on several factors, including the type and extent of the breach, the impact on the parties involved, and the specific terms of the contract. Indian courts carefully consider these factors when determining the appropriate remedy for each case. Usually party want damage or repudiate the contract itself


A. Damages in contract law


1. Compensatory damages

Compensatory damages are monetary awards intended to compensate the non-breaching party for the loss suffered due to the breach.


In the case of Hadley vs. Baxendale (1854), which is a landmark English case that has been adopted in Indian law, the court established the principle that damages should be limited to losses that were foreseeable at the time the contract was formed.


2. Consequential damages

Consequential damages, also known as special damages, are awarded for losses that result indirectly from the breach, provided that these losses were reasonably foreseeable.


In the case of Hotel Leela Venture Ltd. vs. Airports Authority of India (2014), the court awarded consequential damages to the plaintiff for the loss of business due to the defendant's breach.


3. Nominal damages

Nominal damages are small monetary awards granted to the non-breaching party when a breach has occurred, but no actual loss has been suffered.


In the case of R.K. Upadhyay vs. State of Bihar (1995), the court awarded nominal damages to the plaintiff, as it found a breach of contract but no evidence of substantial loss.


4. Punitive damages

Punitive damages, also known as exemplary damages, are awarded in rare cases to punish the breaching party for particularly egregious conduct. Indian courts are generally reluctant to award punitive damages in breach of contract cases.


B. Repudiation of contract


Repudiation of contract occurs when one party communicates to the other party that it intends to terminate the contract or refuses to perform its obligations. The non-breaching party can either accept the repudiation and terminate the contract or continue with its performance. Under the Indian Contract Act, 1872, repudiation of contract is considered a breach of contract, and the non-breaching party is entitled to pursue legal remedies. Section 39 of the Act specifically addresses anticipatory breach, which is a form of repudiation. It states that if one of the parties to a contract refuses to perform their obligations or makes it impossible to perform, the other party may consider the contract as void and claim damages for any loss suffered.


In the case of Muralidhar Chatterjee vs. International Film Co. Ltd. (1943), the court recognized the right of the plaintiff to repudiate the contract due to the defendant's failure to pay royalties.


In the case of S.B.P. & Co. vs. Patel Engineering Ltd. (2005), the Supreme Court of India held that repudiation must be in clear and unambiguous terms, indicating an intention to not fulfill the contract. The court also held that repudiation may be inferred from the breaching party's conduct if it demonstrates a clear intention to not fulfill their obligations.


The remedies available to the non-breaching party in case of repudiation of contract include claiming damages, treating the contract as void, and seeking specific performance. In the case of S.P. Chengalvaraya Naidu vs. Jagannath (1994), the Supreme Court of India held that the non-breaching party has the option to treat the contract as still subsisting and sue for specific performance if they can demonstrate that they are ready and willing to perform their part of the contract.



References:

  1. Indian Contract Act, 1872

  2. Pollock & Mulla, The Indian Contract and Specific Relief Acts (15th ed., 2018)

  3. Avtar Singh, Law of Contract (12th ed., 2016)

  4. R.K. Bangia, Contract I: Cases and Materials (5th ed., 2015)

  5. Supreme Court of India, Judgments: https://main.sci.gov.in/judgments

  6. Indian Kanoon: https://indiankanoon.org

4,251 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page